Creation’s Song

by Alexa Hess

One of my favorite songs is called “Heaven Meets Earth” by All Sons & Daughters. It is a beautiful song about creation and our worshipful response to our Creator. What I also love about this song is that it was inspired by a particular chapter in C.S. Lewis’s book The Magician’s Nephew. This chapter describes Aslan the lion’s creation of this magical world called Narnia. As Aslan sings a song, life begins to appear and grow. One of the children witnessing this work of wonder experiences it in this way:

Polly was finding the song more and more interesting because she thought she was beginning to see the connection between the music and the things that were happening. When a line of dark first sprang up on a ridge about a hundred yards away she felt that they were connected with a series of deep, prolonged notes which the Lion had sung a second before. And when he burst into a rapid series of lighter notes she was not surprised to see primroses suddenly appearing in every direction. Thus, with an unspeakable thrill, she felt quite certain that all the things were coming (as she said) “out of the Lion’s head” (115).

The creation of Narnia is meant to mirror God’s creation of the earth. Although Scripture records God creating through words, I love how this chapter causes us to imagine creation as if God’s words were a melody. By His special song, God created all the beauty and glory we see around us today. But even though God’s song brought about life, life sings a song back to Him. All of creation—the trees, the ocean, the clouds, the animals—whisper a tune that points to the Creator. All Sons & Daughters write this idea in their song by saying: “Creation sings your glory, Creation sings your glory, Hallelujah, rising like the daylight, Heaven meets Earth.”

When you and I look at the pink hues of a sunset or hear the rushing waves of the ocean, we experience a song of worship. Scripture attests to this truth in Psalm 19:1–4. David writes, 

The heavens declare the glory of God, and the expanse proclaims the work of his hands. Day after day they pour out speech; night after night they communicate knowledge. There is no speech; there are no words; their voice is not heard. Their message has gone out to the whole earth, and their words to the ends of the world. 

What David describes here is the theological concept of general revelation. General revelation is the way that God has revealed Himself or made Himself known to us through natural means like creation. General revelation does not describe the fullness of God’s character, nor does it speak specifically to the gospel. This is why God has given us His Word which gives us specific truths of who He is and the message of the gospel. But general revelation still provides us with general truths of who God is. Creation is a symphony that points us to the God who created us and loves us. 

However, not everyone is attuned to creation’s song. Some people are “deaf” to the song of creation, choosing to ignore or deny that creation speaks to a divine creator. But as believers, the grace of God has opened our ears, allowing us to hear and join the song of creation. If you are in Christ, you are able to participate in the song creation sings. Just as the All Sons & Daughters’ song concludes with the words “holy, holy, holy,” we are to respond to the glory of our God and the world He has made with words of praise. 

Take a moment today to gaze at the creation around you. Listen to the leaves rustling in the trees. Watch the birds flying in the sky. Notice the light of the sun bursting through the petals of a flower. Stop and listen to creation’s song and respond with worship to the Lord. Sing His praises for giving you the gift of nature and the beauty of the earth. But also praise Him for giving you Jesus, the One who sang the world into existence with the Father (John 1:1–3). 

Let us not grow too busy with our lives that we miss the song creation sings. Let us not ignore the tune of “holy, holy, holy” that the earth croons. Instead, let us join with the song of creation, worshiping our God who sung it all into existence. 

Works Cited

The Magician’s Nephew by C.S. Lewis

“Heaven Meets Earth” by All Sons & Daughters 

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